Why you should buy a medical marijuana prescription

Medical marijuana patients should be taking a proactive approach to taking their medication, a new study suggests.

The research is part of the Australian Medical Association’s “Medication for the 21st Century” campaign, which has been running since last October.

It is based on a survey of more than 4,000 Australian medical professionals.

The survey asked the doctors to provide feedback on the state of their practices and how they could help patients and patients’ families with their medical needs.

The results were released by the AMA on Thursday.

It was published in the Australasian Journal of Medical Ethics.

The AMA says there are more than 100,000 Australians living with a chronic disease and the medical costs for treating these patients are staggering.

One in four Australians will spend more than $1,000 per year on their care.

A report released last year found the cost of healthcare for chronic pain is higher than it has been in nearly two decades.

The report called for the government to consider providing medical cannabis as a supplement to prescription drugs and to ensure patients were not left without access to a medical cannabis supply.

It also said the use of cannabis was safe, and that it was the most cost effective way to treat pain.

The study found about half of those who took part said they were happy to use medical cannabis to manage their pain.

“We know from previous research that there are a number of medical conditions that patients with a condition that is very debilitating and difficult to manage, including cancer, HIV, Crohn’s disease, ALS, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease,” Dr Helen MacKenzie, AMA executive director, said.

“But what is also clear is that many patients who are diagnosed with a medical condition will also experience pain and other issues that are a consequence of that condition.”

This study shows that many of these patients have a clear need for medical cannabis, and we would encourage patients to use cannabis for that purpose as well as for other medical conditions and conditions that they might have other options to manage.

However, it is important to note that medical marijuana is not a replacement for prescription drugs, and the use or abuse of cannabis can lead to serious adverse health effects, including addiction.” “

The evidence suggests that medical cannabis is an effective treatment for some conditions, including some cancers, which is very good news,” she said.

“However, it is important to note that medical marijuana is not a replacement for prescription drugs, and the use or abuse of cannabis can lead to serious adverse health effects, including addiction.”

It is the first time the AMA has published research on the use and abuse of medical cannabis.

The association’s medical director, Professor David Murray, said the survey was important because it showed doctors had an important role in prescribing medical cannabis and the AMA needed to be part of that.

“This survey is a valuable contribution to the evidence base that supports the need for medicinal cannabis to be made available to Australian patients and to provide a safe, effective and cost effective treatment,” he said.

He said doctors needed to educate their patients about the effects of medical marijuana.

“It’s important for patients to be aware of the potential harms of medical use and to make informed decisions about their use of this substance,” Professor Murray said.

Dr MacKayne said some people who had used cannabis to treat a condition were able to reduce their use.

“There is a significant risk for use for pain relief in chronic pain, for example, but there are also benefits in treating other conditions, particularly nausea and vomiting,” she explained.

“If someone has a chronic pain condition, it can be hard to know what to do when they feel they have stopped using their medication.”

Topics: doctors-and-medical-professionals, health, drugs-and -medicines, drugs, medical-research, australia, sa, nsw First posted July 10, 2019 11:29:17 More stories from South Australia