Why do doctors think you have chronic pain?

When I was diagnosed with chronic pain at the age of five, my doctor told me I needed a spinal tap.

She gave me a prescription for oxycodone, and I took it as prescribed.

When the prescription ran out, she sent me to the emergency room.

The doctor told the nurse I was on morphine.

The nurse said, “Don’t worry, I have morphine for you.”

The doctor then asked, “What are you doing?”

I explained that I was taking a painkiller called codeine to manage my symptoms, but I didn’t want to take any more codeine because it made me sleepy and had a tendency to make me sleepy even when I wasn’t taking any.

She asked, with a bit of incredulity, “But you’re not going to sleep anyway.”

The nurse was not amused.

She told me to stop taking the morphine and I did.

After a few days, my symptoms began to improve.

But then the pain got worse, and by the time I was discharged, I was already using a new painkiller that was much more potent than the one my doctor prescribed.

My pain got even worse when I was in the emergency department.

I had to be admitted to the hospital again because I was so tired.

It took me four days to be discharged from the hospital because I had already taken the morphine.

My doctor told my family that I had chronic pain.

I told them I didn