US doctor is fined $250,000 for prescribing ‘toenails fungus’ medicine

Radnor, Tennessee, US, US Department of Health and Human Services fined a local physician $250 for prescribing “toenailed fungus” medicine to patients.

Dr. Jody S. Miller is a licensed physician in the county of Radnor.

A pharmacist in the town of Radner, he was also licensed to prescribe the “toe-tooth fungus,” or “toe fungus,” which causes inflammation in the feet and the “fungus.”

The medicine was approved for sale on the website of the Radnor-based Presbyterian Church of the Good Shepherd.

But Miller failed to follow directions to avoid making patients uncomfortable and the dosage was far too high, according to a statement from the department.

He was fined $25,000 by the Department of Justice.

The department also fined Miller $50,000 in April for prescribing the same medicine.

The federal case is on hold pending the outcome of the lawsuit, the department said in a statement.

Miller was also charged in a 2015 case involving another physician, and a doctor from the University of Alabama was indicted on similar charges.

The attorney general’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

In addition to the $250 fine, the state said Miller was charged with a misdemeanor count of prescribing “the drug without a prescription, without a physician’s prescription, for a purpose other than for its therapeutic use.”

Miller was not immediately available for comment on the case, and the department did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Reuters.

The US is the only country in the world where doctors cannot prescribe certain medications without a doctor’s prescription.

A doctor cannot prescribe a drug for a condition that they are not allowed to prescribe, such as cancer treatments or heart medications.

A patient can ask a doctor to prescribe a medicine for a certain condition, but it has to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

The agency, however, is unable to approve medications for any condition without a medical board’s approval, including drugs that have been approved for use by doctors in other countries.

Miller’s case highlights the difficulty that health professionals face in getting FDA approval for medicines, which can include medicines that are approved by multiple countries.

Miller’s case is one of a number of recent medical malpractice cases that have drawn scrutiny from the federal government.

In January, a physician in Louisiana was sentenced to nearly $1 million in fines after prescribing drugs that were deemed too powerful for their intended purpose.

In February, an Iowa dentist pleaded guilty to prescribing a drug that was found to be “over-the-counter” and not a controlled substance, but was allowed to remain on the market, despite concerns about its effectiveness.

Last year, a California dentist was sentenced in a medical malactigation case to $1.5 million after he gave a patient a powerful painkiller that was deemed “over the counter,” but was later banned from the market.

Since 2015, the US has also seen the emergence of a growing number of medical malpractices.

In the last year, at least 25 states have enacted laws that allow doctors to prescribe prescription drugs without a license.

In some cases, the prescriptions have resulted in serious problems for patients, including cases in which the drugs have caused serious side effects.

In others, the drugs were not authorized for use, including for chemotherapy, surgery or other treatment for cancer.