How a patient’s brain works may be linked to how they are treated

A study has shown that if a patient with a sinus headache receives a migraine medicine and then develops a migraine attack, that medicine may also affect the person’s brain.

The findings have been published in the journal Frontiers in Neurology.

The study looked at the effects of a combination of anti-inflammatory drugs, including benzodiazepines, on the brains of patients with severe sinus headaches.

It found that anti-inflammatories, including the benzodiazapine hydrocodone, were linked to a higher incidence of migraine attacks, particularly among patients who had been using the drugs for many years.

“These patients were using these drugs for long periods of time,” said lead author Dr Daniela Carvalho from the Department of Neurology at the University of Lisbon.

“These people were using them for long period of time and the anti-interaction between the drugs and their brain might explain why these patients were more prone to migraine attacks,” she said.

“The reason why we can’t say for sure is because the drugs are metabolised differently, which means we can only study patients with a normal metabolism.”

In the study, more than 100 people were divided into two groups: one received the anti, anti-glutamic acid and anti-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) drug, which is known to inhibit the breakdown of the brain’s cannabinoid receptor, and the other group received a placebo.

“We took blood samples, measured the concentrations of brain chemicals, and also we measured the effects on the brain.”

It’s possible that this combination of drugs has a positive impact on the body’s brain,” Dr Carvalgo said.

She said the findings might have implications for treating patients who suffer from migraines.”

Maybe patients who are suffering from migraine can be treated with a combination therapy with anti-psychotics, benzodioxazines, antihistamines, antiarrhythmic drugs, antiinflammatories and the use of antiinflammatory drugs,” she explained.”

If we have the right combination of medications, that combination could be able to treat these patients,” she added.

The research was funded by the Medical Research Council, the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme, the National Institute for Health Research, the Swedish Research Council and the University Health Network.”

These results have significant implications for migraine management, as it is known that migraine is a complex disorder that requires long-term treatment and there is a need to have a long-lasting recovery,” Dr Danielas said.

The research was funded by the Medical Research Council, the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme, the National Institute for Health Research, the Swedish Research Council and the University Health Network.

The ABC has contacted the University Medical Centre, Lisbon, for a comment.

Topics:neurology,medicines-and-drugs,health,health-administration,healthcare-facilities,medics,prescription-prescriptions,tas,benzia,slovenia